Category Archives: Feast of Unleavened Bread

ENOCH CALENDAR: Professor reveals true history

For several years now I have published the Enoch Calendar in its most useful and correct form. But not until I was directed to this article in The Jerusalem Post did I ever find such powerful supporting evidence to show who was responsible for attempting to put the Enoch Calendar out of the minds of the religious. It happened as part of the history of Judaism and by men, acting in place of the priests, shortly after the destruction of the temple in 70 CE. This amazing research establishes what I have believed and taught.

The following is a review by Abraham Rabinovich of a book by Prof. Rachel Elior that explains how the sages invented Judaism as we know it.

This was published in The Jerusalem Post on May 7, 2009.

“From the sun to the moon”

The scene could be out of the Haggada – a group of rabbis sitting on the floor in a circle through the night, probably reclining on pillows, scrolls scattered about them, engaging in heated disputation until the pale light outside signals that a new day is upon them.

The fact that this particular gathering, mentioned in the Talmud, is held in an attic might suggest to a modern reader that there is something clandestine about it, perhaps a desire to take distance from Roman ears or even from the surrounding Jewish population.

Clandestine or not, this meeting, and all the similar gatherings that preceded and followed, contained the seeds of revolution – the radical restructuring of Jewish religious thought and practice that followed the destruction of the Temple in 70 CE.

According to Prof. Rachel Elior of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the rabbis were involved in nothing less than “a reinvention of Judaism… They were closing an old world based on prophecy and angelic revelation and opening the sacred canon to human reinterpretation.”

A glimpse into that intellectual ferment is provided in the brief depiction in the talmudic tractate Shabbat (13b)[See Note 1] of the rabbinic gathering, perhaps in Yavne – which had become the major center of Jewish learning after the destruction of Jerusalem. “That man should be remembered with favor,” the passage says in reference to one of the participants in the meeting, “his name being Hanania son of Hezekiah, for if it were not for him the Book of Ezekiel would have been suppressed and withdrawn as its teachings contradict those of the Torah. What did he do? They brought him jugs of oil [for lamps] and he sat in the attic and expounded upon the texts [through the night].”

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